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Digital Scholarship Research Symposium

May 25th, 2022

We are excited to host the 6th Annual 2022 Digital Scholarship Symposium.  This year's event will be hosted in person with portions of the event streamed via Zoom.  UCSC students are provided two unique opportunities within the symposium to present their digital scholarship projects - an interactive digital poster session and an opportunity for a short VizWall talk.  The event focuses on showcasing the independent, digital research and classroom work of UCSC undergraduate and graduate students.  Join us to explore public facing, media-rich, critically engaged, and creative student research.

This event is planned as an in person event on the ground floor of McHenry Library in the David Kirk Digital Scholarship Commons.  VizWall talks will also be streamed via Zoom.  Registration is required to receive the event's Zoom link.  Same day registrants and physical walk ins are welcom.

Register

Schedule

Opening Remarks
Elizabeth Cowell, Richard L. Press University Librarian Presidential Chair

 

Keynote Speaker
Cult and Copper: Intra-Actions from the Bronze Age to A-Life
Presented by: Casondra Sobieralski

 

Audible Memories: Palestine-Isreal During the Covid-19 Pandemic & Ramadan
Presented by: Nona Golan

Design, Production, and Intellectual Property: The Evolution of Fast Fashion in the Age of Social Media
Presented by: Magali Chonteco

Diatom World
Presented by: Anya Chytrowski

Heaven
Presented by: Valerie Jackson
Project Collaborators: Kai Tattersall, Max Von der Horst, Diya Correa, Partho Gupte, Katherine Montes, Jason O'Connor, Sebastian Sack, Madison Kloeber, Cassie Howell, and Cas Pryer

Audible Memories: Palestine-Isreal During the Covid-19 Pandemic & Ramadan
Presented by: Nona Golan

History in Focus Podcast
Presented by: Myles Rider-Alexis
Other Collaborators: Daniel Story

History of 3D Modeling
Presented by: Shannon Nami Lee, Victoria Chaij, and Myles Rider-Alexis

Hyperreal Dinosaurs
Presented by: Alessia Cecchet

Judge My Vow
Presented by: Ardent Eliot :-) Reinhard

POP
Presented by: Brandon Victoriano

Random World Generation with Modern Technology
Presented by: Sky Casey

SlugCast: UCSC’s Official Podcast
Presented by: David Duncan
Other Collaborators: Erick Msumanje, Gwen Pardon, Isabel Cordova, Jenna-Rose Hards, Jennifer Valdez, Keely Gwynne, Kyle Keller, Tarund Singh, Nitya Tripathi, Bailey Dyson

Design, Production, and Intellectual Property: The Evolution of Fast Fashion in the Age of Social Media
Presented by: Magali Chonteco

Diatom World
Presented by: Anya Chytrowski

Heaven
Presented by: Valerie Jackson
Project Collaborators: Kai Tattersall, Max Von der Horst, Diya Correa, Partho Gupte, Katherine Montes, Jason O'Connor, Sebastian Sack, Madison Kloeber, Cassie Howell, and Cas Pryer

Random World Generation with Modern Technology
Presented by: Sky Casey

Judge My Vow
Presented by: Ardent Eliot :-) Reinhard

Maintaining the balance between proliferation and differentiation in postnatal neural stem cells
Presented by: Ariella Angelini Stewart
Other Collaborators: Jeremiah Tsyporin (UCSC MCD Biology PhD Candidate), Bin Chen (Professor of MCD Biology, Laboratory PI)

History of 3D Modeling
Presented by: Shannon Nami Lee, Victoria Chaij, and Myles Rider-Alexis

POP
Presented by: Brandon Victoriano

Audible Memories: Palestine-Isreal During the Covid-19 Pandemic & Ramadan
Presented by: Nona Golan

The Poetics of Data/Body: Intimating Data Visualization After the Post-Internet Turn
Presented by: Kendall Grady

Keynote Presentation:

Cult and Copper: Intra-Actions from the Bronze Age to A-Life

Casondra Sobieralski
UCSC PhD candidate, Class of 2022

Session:  Keynote Speaker

Through a media archaeology lens, this research project re-casts Bronze Age Levantine goddesses of love and sexuality, who were also goddesses associated with copper, as “proto-cybergoddesses.” This is because copper has played an important role in media technology history, including the history of networked information systems from the telegraph to the internet. Further, the project offers a glimpse into a speculative future in which copper plays a role in quantum computing, and hence the faster evolution of artificial life, or “a-life.”

This story of cult and copper then served as a case study for a cyber-archaeology piece, a meditative VR “game”/experience that focuses on the relationship among smelting, shamanism, and goddess cults. Sobieralski worked with graduate students in the UCSC Serious Games program–a subset of the Engineering department–to realize a playable prototype/proof of concept of this game, which is intended for a museum setting. The cyber-archaeology project’s focus on intangible heritage–herein a techno-craft process and associated belief systems–challenges the tendency of digital heritage projects to only document material remains of the past such as sites and monuments. The VR piece emphasizes embodiment and interoception (bodily awareness) as a means of learning via an interface and a game play process driven by breath. Additionally, the work redefines interaction design as “intra-action” design to show relationality among people, tools, natural elements, environment, processes. In so doing it breaks subject/object binaries and establishes animism as a design metaphor.

Digital Project Showcase:

The presentations listed below are available only during the in-person Interactive Digital Poster Session.  Digital Projects that are also presented as a VizWall Session can be found in their VizWall Session below.

Image of dinosaurs on a set of 4 solid color backgrounds

Hyperreal Dinosaurs

Alessia Cecchet
PhD, Film and Digital Media, 6th year
alcecche@ucsc.edu 

Session:  Digital Project Showcase

Even if no human has ever seen a dinosaur, everyone knows what they looked like. My project is a film that juxtaposes images of dinosaurs. Through animation, differences and similarities in dinosaur representations emerge in a way that can only be afforded through the film apparatus, allowing the viewer to grasp the constructed and hyper-realistic dimensions of dinosaur representation.

History in Focus Podcast

Myles Rider-Alexis
UCSC 3rd Year Undergraduate

Project Collaborators:
Daniel Story (dstory@ucsc.edu)

Listen to the Podcast here!

Session:  Digital Project Showcase

History in Focus is the official podcast of the American Historical Review. It use the most recent content of the journal as a jumping off point to explore the various ways and diverse contexts in which history is done in the 21st century. The University Library's Digital Scholarship Department partners with the AHR to produce the podcast, with digital scholarship librarian Daniel Story serving as host and producer and Myles Rider-Alexis as audio engineering assistant. Recording for the podcast is done the DSC's Audio Production Studio and all audio editing and mixing is done in Logic Pro X.

slugcast logo

Slugcast: UCSC's Official Podcast

David Duncan
UCSC History Phd Candidate and Senior Podcaster with Slugcast
dtduncan@ucsc.edu
emsumanj@ucsc.edu

Project Collaborators:

Erick Msumanje, Gwen Pardon, Isabel Cordova, Jenna-Rose Hards, Jennifer Valdez, Keely Gwynne, Kyle Keller, Tarund Singh, Nitya Tripathi, Bailey Dyson

Website || Instagram || Spotify

Session:  Digital Project Showcase

Slugcast is the official podcast of UC Santa Cruz hosted by the Divison of Student Affairs and Success and is run by both undergrads and graduate students. The Slugcast team produces weekly episodes that stem from their own interests or experiences on campus. Slugcasters continually share ideas and brainstorm future episode topics by looking to the past and future, as well as capturing audio of the present day. 


Slugcast’s first episode aired in February of 2021 and has maintained a weekly presence on all major podcast listening platforms. With a growing audience and Slugcaster team, the podcast explores numerous topics that include COVID protocol updates, prepping for graduate school, in-depth introductions of different departments, local history, student tips for success, interviews with UCSC leaders, world events, and any other new and noteworthy people and events on campus. The team at Slugcast meets regularly for team building, podcast planning, as well as consistent workshops, training, and guest speakers. The team continues to experiment with different audio recording software and equipment in order to maintain the professional and unique sound that makes Slugcast unique. Slugcast is still relatively new and is continuing to experiment with different ways to cover important topics, tell interesting stories, and represent the UCSC community through our podcasts.

VizWall Session 1 Presenters:

The presentations listed here will be presented in VizWall Session 1.  Some projects will also be available to view during the Interactive Digital Project Showcase.

Design, Production, and Intellectual Property: The Evolution of Fast Fashion in the Age of Social Media

Magali Chonteco (She/Her)
UCSC 4th year Undergraduate, Literature major
mchontec@ucsc.edu  

Session:  Digital Project Showcase, VizWall Session 1

Due to the prevalence of social media, the development of the global supply chain, and shifting norms of intellectual property in the design world, many independent fashion designers have had their designs stolen by large corporations and are unable to take any action to remedy the damages that are the result of this theft. My video essay, "The Evolution of Fast Fashion in the Age of Social Media" seeks to explain how we got to this troubling present-day situation through the use of fashion theory in conjunction with an analysis of images and videos compiled from various social media sites. By illustrating how fast trends can spread and develop due to the accessible nature of social media, I hope to illustrate how the fast fashion industry has become a hyper-developed machine that has the capacity to negatively affect the life of each individual, whether they be a consumer or a creator of clothing.

Diatom World

Anya Chytrowski
UCSC 3rd year Undergraduate, Art major

Session:  Digital Project Showcase, VizWall Session 1

"Diatom World" is a documentary about micro-algae, and how we feel about it. Diatoms, microscopic photosynthesizing phytoplankton, play a huge role in regulating climate, supporting oceanic food chains, and generally make the earth a habitable place for human beings. Visually, they are equally compelling, made up on silica walls that form complex and varied shapes.

The project seeks to paint a portrait of diatoms from a variety of angles, speaking with scientists and diatom novices alike. By inserting my perspective and experiences into the film, I examine both the subject, and the act of exploration and research as a personal process.

image of a woman in a green forest with white snow flecks in front

Heaven

Valerie Jackson
4th year Undergraduate, Art major
allisonjackson340@gmail.com 

Project Collaborators:
Kai Tattersall, Max Von der Horst, Diya Correa, Partho Gupte, Katherine Montes, Jason O'Connor, Sebastian Sack, Madison Kloeber, Cassie Howell, and Cas Pryer

Session:  Digital Project Showcase, VizWall Session 1

Heaven is an animated film utilizing artificial intelligence tools and visual sampling in the animation process. Filmed on a 360⁰ camera, this animation works with footage that is stylized with AI and then composited. This project visualizes a possible future for animation and digital media, as well as illustrates the power that AI offers filmmakers. It is our hope to create a workflow that produces animations at a much lower cost and time commitment, making it more accessible to independent artists.

Random World Generation with Modern Technology

Sky Casey
UCSC 3rd year Undergrad, Computer Science: Game Design major
skythecreative@gmail.com

Session:  Digital Project Showcase, VizWall Session 1

I'm working on an adaptable algorithm for random dungeon generation and world-building. I've been wanting to adapt this to as many different types of media as possible, and the main goal is to create a world within the holographic pyramid that the DSI will be receiving.

Judge my Vow

Ardent Eliot :-) Reinhard
4th year Undergraduate, AGPM major

Session:  Digital Project Showcase, VizWall Session 1

Judge my Vow is a fiction webzine in seven parts. It takes place on a cube-shaped world where everything relates to magical pangrams, sentences that contain every letter in the alphabet. Examples of these pangrams are “Sphinx of black quartz, judge my vow,” and “A wizard’s job is to quickly vex chumps in fog.” The story follows Xanax, a ghost who seeks the deific Sphinx of black quartz to have him judge her marriage vow. Along the way, she meets a group of loving transgender friends and creates details about her past that she had lost. Thematically, Judge my Vow is about alternative uses of language, weird characters in a weird world, and leaving home. The story is radically strange, but also personally important, especially on the subjects of gender, mental illness, and friendship.

Judge my Vow was created in HTML using Bootstrap and jQuery. I used a combination of vector and raster graphics in Illustrator and Photoshop as well as collage pieces taken from the internet. I designed and typeset the print version in InDesign. The covers on the physical versions were made with the Cricut.

VIzWall Session 2 Presenters:

The presentations listed here will be presented in VizWall Session 2.  Some projects will also be available to view during the Digital Project Showcase.

Maintaining the balance between proliferation and differentiation in postnatal neural stem cells

Ariella Angelini Stewart
UCSC Senior Undergraduate, Neuroscience & Chemistry (focus: Biochemistry) Double Major
ariella.stewart@gmail.com

Project Collaborators:
Jeremiah Tsyporin (UCSC MCD Biology PhD Candidate), Bin Chen (Professor of MCD Biology, Laboratory PI)

Session:  VizWall Session 2

The vast majority of neurons are generated before birth. However, there are two distinct stem cell niches that generate neurons postnatally, the subgranular zone of the hippocampus and subventricular zone. The balance of new neuron production and stem cell depletion in adult neural stem cells is tightly regulated by transcription factors. One transcription factor, Fezf2, has been extensively studied in the cortex throughout embryonic stages. However, its function in the postnatal stem cell niche in the mammalian brain is still unknown. We found that Fezf2 is specifically expressed in the majority of Sox2+ Gfap+ neural stem cells in the subgranular zone. To understand the function of Fezf2 in the postnatal stem cells, we analyzed the Fezf2 mutant mice and evaluated potential mechanisms by which Fezf2 functions.
 

History of 3D Modeling

Shannon Nami Lee
UCSC 3rd year Undergraduate, Art and Business Management Economics Double Major

Victoria Chaij
4th Year Undergraduate, Art Major with Minor in Film and Digital Media

Myles Rider-Alexis
3rd Year Undergraduate, Film and Digital Media Major 

Session:  Digital Project Showcase, VizWall Session 2

Digital Scholarship Commons Video, Audio, and 3D leads present their collaborative project: "The History of 3D Modeling," a short animated video covering the development of 3D modeling technology from Euclidean mathematical concepts to modern CAD software. 

POP

Brandon Victoriano
UCSC 4th year Undergraduate, Film & Digital Media and Psychology Double Major, Economics Minor || Class of 2022

Session:  Digital Project Showcase, VizWall Session 2

My project is the production of a large scale student short film titled "POP". With a crew of over 30 students, I wanted to see what it would look like producing a project of this scale. This project will provide an introspective and insightful look into my own processes as a filmmaker. This project has pushed me to question each step of production as I shifted strategies in order to address creative constraints such as dealing with COVID restrictions. I have documented the production of this film in various ways and I hope by analyzing my own process, I can inspire others to take a look at their own processes and see how they can shift traditional methods of production in order to cater to whatever constraints they may face.

Audible Memories: Palestine-Israel during the COVID-19 Pandemic & Ramadan

Nona Golan
Class of 2022, Anthropology major, GISES minor
nona.golan@gmail.com  

Session:  Digital Project Showcase, VizWall Session 2

Occupation and its intricacies are audible. In Juha's Guesthouse, Binyamina Square, and Jaffa, I recorded (with an iPhone 8, Audio Memos App) the sounds of my family and friends, strangers and loved ones, chaos and calm. This exhibit is a compilation of audible memories that is meant to engage us in dialogue with the sounds of my time in Palestine/Israel during September to June of 2020-21. Throughout this time, the COVID-19 pandemic, high holidays, and fighting took place. What may seem like cacophony has been placed with intention, chaos and meaning, and is a piece of a greater (sometimes overwhelming) sensorium. 

You are encouraged to listen to the overlapping moments in my memory and imagination. The process of listening and recording kept me from disassociating in times of chaos, curious in times of loneliness, and nostalgic in times of feeling home and love.

I hope these pieces that I brought back with me stir feelings and thoughts that you'll share with us. There are sounds in here that maybe only you will hear, and which we need to better hear the world around us.

The Poetics of Data/Body: Intimating Data Visualization After the Post-Internet Turn

Kendall Grady
UCSC PhD candidate in Literature and Creative Writing

 

Session:  VizWall Session 2

My creative/critical research practice investigates the intimate lives of post-internet subjectivities, including my own, that mark, according to Florian Cramer, a cultural turn in which fascination with the digital has become historical. 

Poetic devices traditionally serve to foreground their medium specificity relative to the language of other literary genres, nonliterary texts, everyday speech, computational language, etc. as in a form of glitch, making a poem more of a poem. In contrast, what I conceive of as post-internet poetry exists within the context of culture after the internet as a form of black box. To the extent that post-internet can persist as a medium, it is in Marshall McLuhan’s sense of a technological extension of human grasp, an interface translating between body and environment.

Post-internet requires therefore that we read intimate, first person work–such as the love poems featured in my dissertation manuscript Couple/Couplet–under the premise of a lyric subject as one mobile node in a network both semiotically, as in the metaphor of post-internet connectivity, and materially, as in the ways in which the self is understood and expressed online. I argue that this decentralized, post-internet “I” is not distilled or eclipsed by its network, but rather, activates an agency distributed among other agencies, including information circulation and reproducibility, the irruption of linear temporality, algorithmic culture, mass surveillance, data mining, open source access, and ubiquitous authorship. In fact, the ways in which the “I” affects and is affected by its contemporary environment–an interloping viscosity grasping between on- and offline– is not incongruent with how poetry has always interpreted and metabolized everyday life. 

Applying the lens of Jussi Parikka’s “media archaeology,” I will perform a close reading of an original poem emerging from a Gephi directed social graph I generated using DMI Twitter Analytics. The resulting data visualization represents hashtag patterns relevant to the Art Basel Miami Beach art fair in order to map patterns of communication and locate local communities. If web epistemologists study the internet as a distinct knowledge culture–if Twitter is an archiveable object of study– then it also has mass: it can feel, collide, fall (in love). My data/body was there, too: in Florida, in the fair crowds, (in love). The poem I will share and analyze is not so much an interpretation of the graph as it is a response to it– a refusal, in fact, to accept data as a closed system and an insistence upon #heartbreak in excess of medium specificity.