This is the "Home" page of the "Distinguish between Popular and Scholarly Journals" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

Distinguish between Popular and Scholarly Journals   Tags: find help, how do i...?  

Last Updated: Nov 21, 2013 Guide URL: http://guides.library.ucsc.edu/distinguish-between-popular-and-scholarly-journals Print Guide RSS Updates

Home Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

Ask a Librarian

Ask a librarian

In Person | Phone | Email | Chat

Related Guides

 

Introduction

The compilation of resources for research papers or projects necessarily includes not only books, but also articles from periodicals (i.e., journals and/or magazines)—vital sources of up-to-date information and scholarship. When issuing assignments, instructors often specify whether articles consulted are to be from popular or scholarly publications (the former usually referred to as magazines, the latter as journals). Although popular sources are not without merit and may also contain well-considered writing, the purpose of distinguishing between these types of works is to determine their degree of authority and depth of research on a given topic, and thereby their intrinsic academic value. The following chart points out the distinctions between popular and scholarly periodicals.

 

Popular vs. Scholarly

POPULAR SCHOLARLY
Broad range of topics, presented in shorter articles Specific, often narrowly focused topics in lengthy, in-depth articles
Articles offer overview of subject matter; reportage, rather than original research; sometimes contain feature articles and reports on current social issues andpublic opinion Articles often contain previously unpublished research and detail new developments in field
Intended to attract a general readership without any particular expertise or advanced education Intended for specialist readership of researchers, academics, students and professionals
Written by staff (not always attributed) or freelance writers using general, popular language Written by specialists and researchers in subject area, usually employing technical, subject-specific language and jargon
Edited and approved for publication in-house (not peer-reviewed) Critically evaluated by peers (fellow scholars)   in field for content, scholarly soundness, and academic value
Articles rarely contain references or footnotes and follow no specific format Well-researched, documented articles nearly always follow standard format:
abstract, introduction, literature review, methodology, results, conclusion,   bibliography/references
Designed to attract eye of potential newsstand customers: usually filled with photographs or illustrations, printed on glossier paper Sober design: mostly text with some tables or graphs accompanying articles; usually little or no photography; negligible, if any, advertising; rarely printed on high-gloss paper
Each issue begins with page number '1' Page numbers of issues within a volume (year) are usually consecutive (i.e., first page of succeeding issue is number following last page number of previous issue)
Presented to entertain, promote point of view, and/or sell products Intended to present researchers' opinions and findingsbased on original research
Examples: Newsweek, Rolling Stone, Vogue Examples: American Sociological ReviewJournal of Popular Culture, Sustainable Agriculture
Description

Loading  Loading...

Tip