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LALS 172: Digital Story Project

Historical Photographs

Maps

General Creative Commons Image Sources

Creative Commons logoCreative Commons and other "Special Licenses"

There is a lot of media that has been made available for anyone to use, waiving the need to obtain direct permission from the author. For example, a very common license is an "Attribution" license, meaning that you can use the media for any purpose as long as you give credit to the creator somewhere in your work. The non-profit organization Creative Commons offers a variety of attribution licenses that creators apply to their work to make available for public use. Learn more about Creative Commons licensing. Search for works with a Creative Commons license.

Reused with permission from Georgetown University Library

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Fair Use

"Fair Use" is a provision in US copyright law that imposes limits and exceptions to the exclusive rights of authors / creators.

It means that you can use copyright-protected media without asking for permission if is considered fair, such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.

Fair Use Guidelines for student projects:

  • Always give full credit - In your citation you should include the creator, title of the work, date of publication, and URL. (Note: "youtube.com" should never be cited as the creator - it is always the user or company who made the original content)
  • Only use a small amount (e.g. 5-10 seconds of video or music)
  • If shared online, consider making your project private. There are usually ways to share a project privately without making it publicly available for anyone to see -- for example, there are settings in Youtube.com to make videos "unlisted" so that only people with a link will ever see your video.

Learn more about Fair Use:

Reused with permission from Georgetown University Library