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2018 Digital Research & Teaching Symposium

Digital Research and Teaching Symposium
featuring Undergraduate Digital Research and Innovative Pedagogy

This event will showcase the independent, digital research and classroom work of undergraduate students alongside the innovative assignment design and pedagogical experimentation of faculty and graduate students. Join us in the morning to focus on undergraduate digital research and in the afternoon for an in-depth discussion about new methods in active and engaged pedagogy.

Lunch will be included for participants and registered attendees

Co-sponsored by The Humanities Institute, the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning, and The Digital Scholarship Commons (University Library).

REGISTER NOW

 

Wednesday, May 23, 2018
9 am - 3pm in the Digital Scholarship Commons (Ground Floor, McHenry Library)

9: 00 Light Breakfast + Coffee

9:30 - 10:30 Digital Poster Session​: Undergraduate Research + Graduate Student Pedagogy projects

10:30 - 11:45 Panel of Undergraduate Digital Research Fellows (Moderator, Ebad Rahman)
                      Fellows: Sara Alhanich, Zoe Brook, Morgan Carter, Elliot Eckholm, Thao Le, Sarah Wikle

11:45 - 1:30 Lunch + Break

1:30 - 3:00 Round table on Innovative Pedagogy with Faculty and Graduate Students (Moderators, Kendra Dority and Aaron Zachmeier)       
                  Panelists: Noriko Aso (History); David Donley (Philosophy); Kara Hisatake (Literature); Cynthia Tibbets (Philosophy)

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DIGITAL POSTER SESSION

 

 

MAPS, GAMES, and ONLINE STORYTELLING [in DSC Lab] 

  • Janel Catajoy, what is already gone // reverberate

  • Lehna Cohen, Popular Music Media Curation

  • Savannah Dawson, Temple of Philae - 3D Reconstruction

  • Edward Geng, DE PARTHIS ARTIS AMATORIAE OVIDII NASONIS

  • David Grothe, The Temple of Palatine Apollo

  • Helena Panchenko, The Holocaust through a Digital Lens

  • Charles Miller, Superball: A Dodgeball RPG

  • Erin Swaim, Roman Triumphs

  • Bryan Tor, 100 Days of Trump

 

VR: A VIVE experience [in VizLab] 

  • Aubrey Isaacman and Jared Pettitt, everybody said

 

PODCASTS + OPEN SOURCE CODING  [in DSC] 

  • Sasha Landau, Examining "Show-Facebook-Computer-Vision-Tags"

  • Jazmin Lucia Lopez, "Quién es Terana Burke?, y la política de #metoo"

  • Jake Lutz, Facial Recognition in Five Minutes

 

GRAD STUDENT PEDAGOGY [in DSC] 

  • Melissa Brzycki & Stephanie Montgomery, East Asia for All

  • Xiaofei (Faye) Gao, From #MeToo to #RiceBunny:  Anti-sexual Harassment in Chinese Colleges

  • Kara Hisatake, Analyzing Visual Representations of the Pacific with Scalar

  • Cynthia Tibbetts, Students Love Pizza: Creatively Scaffolding Critical Thinking Practice

  • Veronika Zabolotsky, Teaching Freedom & Race


CALL FOR DIGITAL POSTERS IS NOW CLOSED
If you are still interested in presenting your work at the Digital Research + Teaching Symposium, please send an email to Rachel Deblinger at rdebling@ucsc.edu.

UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH + COURSE WORK 

We invite all undergraduate students engaged in creative, critical research using digital tools and platforms to submit proposals for a Digital Poster Session. As part of the larger symposium, the Digital Poster Session provides an opportunity for students to display their work and invite one-on-one conversation without a formal presentation. 

The Digital Poster Sessions allows students to highlight the interactivity of their work by presenting live digital projects and we encourage you submit live projects or project prototypes when possible. Classroom work is welcome: you can submit a proposal for individual or group work as long as all authors are represented on the project. 

GRADUATE INNOVATIVE PEDAGOGY WORK

We invite all graduate students to submit INNOVATIVE PEDAGOGY PROJECTS or TEACHING ASSIGNMENTS meant to inspire undergraduate learning around digital technologies or public engagement. As part of the larger symposium, the Digital Poster Session provides an opportunity for students to display their work and invite one-on-one conversation without a formal presentation.